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Posts Tagged ‘Geoduck’

Kitsap Sun: Arsenic testing of geoducks possible

By • Mar 28th, 2014 • Category: NWIFC Blog

The Kitsap Sun reported on the recent in-person meeting between U.S.’s National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and Chinese officials about China’s ban of  geoduck imported from the United States’ West Coast.

While China was satisfied with testing for paralytic shellfish poisoning, the biggest issue was testing for arsenic, the Kitsap Sun reported. The United States does not routinely test for arsenic but NOAA officials said …



Jamestown S’Klallam, WDFW partner on Strait Geoduck Study

By • Sep 24th, 2013 • Category: News

Due to its popularity with harvesters and shellfish lovers, scientists are learning more about geoduck clams found in the Strait of Juan de Fuca.

During the past two years, the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe, Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) have been collecting age and genetic data from these particular bivalves found in the Strait.

Geoduck is currently managed as



Smithsonian magazine features Squaxin Island Tribe’s geoduck fishery

By • Feb 26th, 2009 • Category: NWIFC Blog

From the Smithsonian Magazine (hat-tip to Squaxin Natural Resources blog):

Craig Parker popped his head above the surf, peeled off his dive mask and clambered aboard the Ichiban. We were anchored 50 yards offshore from a fir-lined peninsula that juts into Puget Sound. Sixty feet below, where Parker had spent his morning, the seafloor was flat and sandy—barren, to unschooled eyes, except for the odd



Lummi fishermen dig deep for geoducks

By • Feb 12th, 2008 • Category: NWIFC Blog

The Bellingham Herald writes about Lummi tribal geoduck harvest:

Cliff Cultee and other Lummi geoduck divers hope to get a chance to harvest the big, meaty clams again this spring.

Geoducks, like all bivalves, are subject to temporary contamination from microorganisms that can cause paralytic shellfish poisoning. Geoducks in the tribal harvest area near Kingston, off the Kitsap Peninsula, have been off-limits to commercial harvest since



China Epidemic Damaging Tribal Shellfish Exports

By • Jun 2nd, 2003 • Category: NWIFC Blog

OLYMPIA (May 30, 2003) — Tribal shellfish harvesters across western Washington have been reporting drastic drops in orders due to the continuing Severe Acute Repertory Syndrome (SARS) epidemic in China. “Geoducks are eaten in restaurants in China, but now because of SARS, it seems like no one even wants to go out in public,” said Dave Winfrey, shellfish biologist with the Puyallup Tribe of Indians. Most …