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Archives for the ‘NWIFC Blog’ Section

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How treaty tribes reacted to a lower than expected chinook run in Puget Sound

By • Oct 16th, 2014 • Category: NWIFC Blog

Chinook are spawned be the Nisqually Tribe at the Kalama Creek hatchery. The tribe operates two hatcheries on the Nisqually that provide fish for harvest by sport, tribal and commercial fishermen.

Across most of Puget Sound, tribal fisheries and hatchery managers report that fall chinook returns are running at about one-third of preseason expectations.

“The fish came in late and low, but enough to get our …



Sequim Gazette: Tribe, State restoration work results in returning chum

By • Oct 11th, 2014 • Category: NWIFC Blog

The Sequim Gazette reported on this fall’s return of summer chum to Jimmycomelately Creek. Numbers aren’t as high this year as last year’s 8,000 fish that returned to the creek, but biologists credit the overall increased numbes of fish returning to the creek to both the state’s supplementation program and Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe’s massive restoration of the creek in 2004.

From the story:

For the past



New backgrounder on treaty rights in western Washington

By • Oct 10th, 2014 • Category: NWIFC Blog

Recently we put together a new four page backgrounder on treaty rights in the region. It covers the history and legal doctrine upon which treaty rights are based.

Here’s a sample:

It is important to note that treaties containing essentially the same language by which the tribes reserved the right to fish, hunt and gather were signed with the tribes in western Washington, the Columbia River



NWIFC Magazine: Steelhead hatchery broodstock and new leadership

By • Oct 9th, 2014 • Category: NWIFC Blog, NWIFC Magazine

The new NWIFC magazine is available for download. In this edition, you can read about our new leadership here at the commission and about tribe’s using hatchery broodstock to help support weak steelhead runs.

From the magazine:

The steelhead population in the Skokomish  River  has  doubled  since  the  Skokomish Tribe started a supplementation projectin  2006,  part  of  a  16-year-long  project  to boost the steelhead population in



KING5: Bird poop and logs on the Elwha River

By • Oct 8th, 2014 • Category: NWIFC Blog

KING 5 sat down this week with Kim Sager-Fradkin, the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe’s wildlife biologist, to discuss the latest wildlife project that is part of the restoration of the Elwha River.



Video: Stillaguamish Tribe Spawns Chinook at Harvey Creek Hatchery

By • Oct 7th, 2014 • Category: NWIFC Blog, Video

In August and September, the Stillaguamish Tribe spawned adult chinook collected on the North Fork of the Stillaguamish River. The tribe’s hatchery supplementation program has provided a comprehensive and long-running coded-wire tag harvest rate indicator data set.

Next spring, the tribal natural resources staff will release the offspring of these fish to ensure that the genetic integrity of the stock remains intact while not being vulnerable …



Everett Herald: Stillaguamish Tribe chairman named to Indian fisheries post

By • Oct 2nd, 2014 • Category: NWIFC Blog

From the Everett Herald:

Shawn Yanity, chairman of the Stillaguamish Tribe, has been elected vice chair of the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission.

“I’m there for the commission to help carry the voice of the 20 tribes in their interests,” Yanity said. “It’s a huge honor, and it’s a huge responsibility.”

“Our tribe can be a little more active in this,” Yanity said. “It’s an honor



Ecology releases preliminary draft rules for standards that increase cancer risk

By • Oct 1st, 2014 • Category: NWIFC Blog

Cross posted at Keep Seafood Clean.

The Associated Press covered the release of a preliminary draft rule on new water quality standards:

The state Department of Ecology on Tuesday released a draft rule that updates contentious water quality standards partly tied to how much fish people eat.

The official draft rule will be released in January 2015 and will include a public comment period. …



Putting climate change in context at the Squaxin Island Tribe

By • Sep 29th, 2014 • Category: NWIFC Blog

Candace Penn, natural resources staff and Squaxin Island tribal member, recently attended a conference on climate change in Seattle. Her new post at the tribe’s natural resources blog puts the issues in context with her community:

Our traditions and ceremonies depend on healthy salmon runs as well as shellfish harvesting. Sea level rise caused by climate change could cause our first foods to no longer be



King 5: Radio transmitters lead Puyallup tribal biologists to salmon

By • Sep 9th, 2014 • Category: NWIFC Blog

Gary Chittim at King 5 had this report:

Tribal Biologist Justin Paul said a program that uses radio transmitters is designed to help slow down the number of salmon dying. The salmon in question were captured at a dam near Buckley then trucked around the dam and released upriver.

Paul said a number of factors could cause the deaths, including predators like otters and bears,